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Calderdale Bid To Become 'Best Borough In The North'

Calderdale Council Cabinet met at Halifax Town Hall.

The borough has climbed the rankings from 6th to 5th.

Calderdale has gone up from sixth to fifth overall among 20 comparative northern boroughs, in its bid to become Best Borough in the North, councillors heard.

Introducing the annual report, Calderdale Council Cabinet member Jane Scullion (Lab, Luddenden Foot) said 87 per cent of the 15 super key performance indicators used in the reports were being met or were close to the target.

Councillor Scullion said Calderdale successes include the numbers of small and medium size businesses, who also have good survival rate, a good employment rate (77 per cent), and higher weekly pay than regional and northern borough averages.

“Yes, we want jobs but we want good jobs,” she said.

Calderdale also had good secondary education, heading national, regional and northern borough performances and high quality children’s social care.

It was also attracting increasing numbers of visitors, with tourism now worth £344 million to the local economy.

Calderdale also faced challenges including childhood obesity, increasing demand on children’s and also adults’ social services and climate emergency, all problems nationally too, she said.

These would need to be faced going forward.

Coun Susan Press (Lab, Todmorden), Cabinet member for Public Services and Communities, also raised issues of crime, which had increased, and housing, where the council had dropped to 18th out of 20 comparable authorities.

She said she was confident both areas would be tackled, the former following the recent enforcement review, and the latter soon seeing homes delivered across the borough.

Coun Faisal Shoukat (Lab, Park), Cabinet member for Public Health and Cohesion, said measures were being put in place to tackle childhood obesity, including a focus through schools on healthy diets.

Liberal Democrat Group Leader Coun James Baker (Warley) said the crime and housing issues stood out as ones which needed tackling – despite better salaries it was difficult for the borough’s young people to get on the housing ladder.

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